Saulius Krusna, who is Rorkas and how is he related to comics?

After see­ing Rorkas works for the first time, I instantly mem­or­ized him. A unique style dis­tin­guished him from other Lithuanians and even from most of the for­eign illus­trat­ors I knew. His draw­ings strongly remind styl­ist­ics of old school com­ics. Black and white pic­tures appear to be like extracts from some kind of stor­ies which only exist in the artist’s mind. Wavy lively lines cre­ate an impel­lent image which either sharpens or dis­guises some details. Even black back­ground is not simply black, after peer­ing into it for some time you see its depth and space.

I would like to wish Saulius good luck, I hope that his dreams will soon come true and I would like to be the first one to find his per­sonal comic book in a bookstore.

As usual, I asked Rorkas to describe himself.

Umm, describ­ing myself? Even I don’t know myself quite well and telling this to you is a dif­fi­cult task. My name is Saulius, I’m mar­ried, I’ll soon be a dad, I know what it means when dreams come true (it was back then when my work was everything for me), I don’t smoke, I don’t drink alco­hol, I tend to lie, I’m also self-​ironic, vul­gar, annoy­ing and I cur­rently take an import­ant pos­i­tion of unem­ployed. And finally, one import­ant fact: my shoe size is 42.

How your cur­rent draw­ing style was formed?

It was due to lazi­ness and the lack of space. This tech­nique doesn’t require much space in the house. It’s par­tic­u­larly con­veni­ent when in you live in a tiny box.

Could you reveal the mean­ing of Rorkas pseudonym?

Are you really curi­ous? Three years ago and only for fun I’ve decided to try using one art site which was notori­ous in Lithuania and gen­er­ally dis­liked by artists – Deviantart​.com. I had to come up with a nick­name when I was filling a regis­tra­tion form. The first thing that came into my mind was the name of one com­ics char­ac­ter I admired. And this is it. I’d love to be called by my real name but I have no other choice now, cha cha…

It’s not dif­fi­cult to notice that your works quite often include social meta­phors. How the Internet soci­ety and other sur­round­ing things affect your art?

I’m not nat­ur­ally a sociopath, maybe it’s only another form of arrog­ance which I some­times express in my sketches. After all, draw­ing is also a form of ther­apy. A ther­apy for me and envir­on­ment. It’s a pity that I am not able to affect this envir­on­ment by using my fists so I just leave my com­ments for a sheet of paper.

I am aware that you are very much into com­ics and together with other authors you’ve con­trib­uted in cre­at­ing the first com­ics in Lithuania — Musiukas Flukas (Flukas the fly). What inspired you to get into this genre? Maybe you are devel­op­ing some new inter­est­ing projects?

Comics is a pas­sion of my life. I don’t know why. It was due to the cir­cum­stances or maybe love for PICTURES was simply encoded in genes. Flukas is only a small moment which I don’t tend to place between my other achieve­ments. Long time ago, when we only had para­graphs in news­pa­pers instead of the Internet, I’ve pub­lished my own paper comics.

You can find out more about my work as a pub­lisher here.

My plans? These are rather dreams. And it’s not appro­pri­ate to speak about dreams out loud.


Your graphic works often include vari­ous mys­tique creatures as well as women. Why did you choose these top­ics? What kind of emo­tions and ideas they rep­res­ent while being a part of Rorkas’ pictures?

I don’t choose top­ics, they simply come to me. I don’t know what will be cre­ated when I take a sheet of paper. Inspirations often come from pho­to­graphs, musical pieces, remin­is­cence or dreams. When I draw, I try not to think about any­thing, espe­cially about the final res­ult. Why should I be troubled by terms or defin­i­tions for­mu­lated by someone I don’t know? I’m not cer­tain whether these creatures and women exist­ing in my sub­con­scious­ness are a res­ult of some break­down in my soul. It’s up to you to decide, dear view­ers of my small works.


Which artist left the biggest impres­sion to you? Perhaps there is someone whose works inspired you so strongly that it con­trib­uted in shap­ing your cur­rent draw­ing style?

I’m not inter­ested in arts, I don’t fol­low recent trends. I fre­quently don’t remem­ber names. Flow of visual inform­a­tion is enorm­ous nowadays, there­fore, remem­ber­ing all names, nick­names or pseud­onyms are too com­plic­ated. I like black and white graph­ics as well as an illus­tra­tion though. Still, I admire those artists who have mastered their col­our skills, elec­tronic art etc. I could put down these names to my sources of inspir­a­tion: Moebius, Andreas, Hippolyte, Thomas Ott, Alberto Breccia, Alex Raymond, Lorenzo Mattotti, Bernie Wrightson, Jeffrey Jones.

What is the thick­ness of your rapidograph? :)

My favour­ite is 0,35mm thick iso­graph from ROTRING. Sometimes it may be 0,25mm.

More of Rorkas’ art may be found here.

Aleksandr Pasevin
About author:
Aleksandr Pasevin
Aleksandr Pasevin is Art Pit’s strategist and designer, responsible for organization’s creative solutions. Aleksandr is also actively interested in new technologies, their connection with creativity and usage in cultural organizations. Aleksandr dislikes long discussions and considerations, and he mostly expresses his opinion quickly about whet... Read further >
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